Nỗi sợ hãi vì thất nghiệp đe dọa toàn nước Mỹ

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8147963/More-37-MILLION-jobs-vulnerable-layoffs-small-large-businesses-set-suffer.html

Nỗi lo về suy thoái của coronavirus: Hơn 37 TRIỆU việc làm ở Hoa Kỳ có thể bị cắt giảm cho các doanh nghiệp nhỏ và lớn phải chịu đựng như cửa hàng sách STRAND biểu tượng của NYC, nơi đã cắt giảm 89% nhân viên và công ty Westjet cắt giảm gần một nửa nhân viên của mình.

Hơn 37 triệu việc làm có thể bị mất ở Mỹ trong thời gian ngắn vì đại dịch coronavirus, tìm thấy trong nghiên cứu của US Private Sector Job Quality Index.

Những người dễ bị tổn thương nhất trong xã hội sẽ bị ảnh hưởng nặng nề nhất là những mất việc làm, với 35,2 triệu công việc lương thấp, giờ thấp với thu nhập hàng tuần dưới 800 đô la bị mất.

10 triệu việc làm nhà hàng và công nghiệp thực phẩm sẽ bị mất, sáu triệu trong quần áo và bán lẻ, và sáu triệu hỗ trợ.

Việc đóng cửa nhà nước đã được tăng cường, buộc các nhà hàng, quán bar, nhà bán lẻ và các nhóm khách sạn phải đóng cửa cửa hàng và sa thải công nhân.

Cửa hàng sách STRAND của New York đã tuyên bố họ đã sa thải 89% nhân viên – ngay cả trong cuộc Đại khủng hoảng 9/11 chưa phải chuyển sang các biện pháp quyết liệt như vậy

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More than 37 million jobs could be lost in the US over the coming months due to the toll the coronavirus pandemic is taking on the nation’s businesses, with food and beverages workers hardest hit

More than 37 million people in jobs are vulnerable to being laid off in the short term, according to the US Private Sector Job Quality Index, Cornell University Law School’s project.

These shock estimates mean around a quarter of the current working population will find themselves out of work in the near future.

Low-paid, hourly workers are expected to be hardest hit, meaning it is those who can least afford to lose their jobs who are the biggest risk, the research finds.

A staggering 35.2 million low-wage and low-hour jobs, with a weekly average income of under $800, are vulnerable to being laid off right now, compared with just 1.9 million high-wage jobs.

The report explains that workers in industries ‘that are effectively being forced to shut down’ are most affected: ‘There is a subset of these workers, in jobs often offering substantially less income than the above average, who are particularly vulnerable to cessation of economic activity due to the spreading pandemic. Many occupy front-line, customer-facing jobs that offer both low hourly wages and a limited number of hours of work per week.’

Restaurant and food industry workers are most at risk, with more than 10 million jobs expected to be lost in the sector, the report shows. A worker paints plywood covering boarded up windows in Kansas on Monday as a restaurant is prepared for potentially prolonged closure due to the coronavirus pandemic. Low-paid, hourly workers are expected to be hardest hit+8

A worker paints plywood covering boarded up windows in Kansas on Monday as a restaurant is prepared for potentially prolonged closure due to the coronavirus pandemic. Low-paid, hourly workers are expected to be hardest hitA staggering 35.2 million low-wage and low-hour jobs, with a weekly average income of under $800, are vulnerable to being laid off right now, research finds+8

A staggering 35.2 million low-wage and low-hour jobs, with a weekly average income of under $800, are vulnerable to being laid off right now, research finds

Clothing and retail will be the next hardest hit, with more than six million predicted to be turfed out of employment, followed by just less than six million in support and accommodation – notably hotels – and over four million in the automotive industry. 

This comes as little surprise as these industries have so far been hammered by the fallout of the pandemic.

The restaurant and bar industry has all but ground to a halt, after state-wide orders mandated their closures to help limit the spread of the virus.

California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin have all issued shutdowns over the last week, meaning non-essential workers can no longer go to work and non-essential businesses have had to close. 

This has left one in three Americans ordered to stay home – and so many workers have already found themselves out of work as the virus continues to throttle the US economy.

The hardest hit industries are also those that rely heavily on low-paid, hourly workers, who often don’t have access to sick pay.

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Civil rights groups are also warning that black and Hispanic workers will be especially impacted, because they already mainly occupy these low-paid industries.

‘We know that when the economy goes into decline, people of color always bear the brunt,’ said Teresa Candori, communications director for the National Urban League told USA Today. 

‘We will be fighting to make sure the most vulnerable communities are not an afterthought.’ 

Three million Americans are expected to file unemployment claims for the first time this week, marking the highest number ever seen in US history, warned Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

This would mark the highest number of new unemployment claims ever seen in US history, more than four times the record high of nearly 700,000 set in the depths of the 1982 recession. A pizza restaurant in New York is boarded up. Restaurant and food industry workers are most at risk, with more than 10 million jobs expected to be lost in the sector, the report shows+8

A pizza restaurant in New York is boarded up. Restaurant and food industry workers are most at risk, with more than 10 million jobs expected to be lost in the sector, the report shows

And economists have warned that this is only the start, with a JPMorgan Chase economist warning clients on a conference call Friday to expect the unemployment rate to skyrocket from 3.5 percent today to 20 percent, meaning one in five Americans will soon be out of work. 

New York City’s iconic Strand bookstore added to the escalating figures on Sunday when it announced it had laid off 188 employees and closed its doors indefinitely.

The 93-year-old stalwart of the city’s East Village announced the bleak news that it had cut staff by a staggering 89 percent, with just 24 workers lucky enough to be kept on the firm’s payroll.

In a statement, the firm said it was left with no choice to ax staff as it is not classed ‘essential’ under New York state’s coronavirus shutdown rules and so could no longer operate even as an online-only retailer.

‘In order to preserve The Strand as a business, with no revenue coming in and no clear idea as to when we can reopen our doors, we have had to temporarily lay off the majority of our staff,’ owner Nancy Bass Wyden said in a statement y.  New York City's iconic Strand bookstore has announced it has laid off 188 employees and closed its doors indefinitely amid the city's coronavirus shutdown+8

New York City’s iconic Strand bookstore has announced it has laid off 188 employees and closed its doors indefinitely amid the city’s coronavirus shutdown

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